River of Grass (1994) & The Watermelon Woman (1996)

Wednesday, March 22, 2017
7:30 pm - 10:30 pm, UCLA Hammer Museum - Billy Wilder Theater

UCLA Festival of Preservation 2017

See below for additional information.

Admission

Advance tickets are available online for $10.

Tickets are also available at the Billy Wilder Theater box office beginning one hour before showtime: $9, general admission; free to all UCLA students with valid ID; $8, other students, seniors and UCLA Alumni Association members with ID.

A $50 festival pass is available and grants admission to all Festival of Preservation screenings!

Contact

Film and Television Archive
(310) 206-8013
archive@cinema.ucla.edu

Website

https://www.cinema.ucla.edu/events/2017/ucla-festival-o...

Additional Information

River of Grass (1994) directed by Kelly Reichardt. “A road movie without the road, a love story without love, and a crime story without the crime”—thus is writer-director Reichardt's own description of her sublime, semi-autobiographical feature film debut. Taking a page from Terrence Malick's Badlands (1973), River of Grass employs the ennui-ridden housewife Cozy (Lisa Bowman) as its increasingly unreliable narrator as she and degenerate barfly Lee Ray (Larry Fessenden, who also produced and cut the film) embrace the misadventures that could only befall amateur, wanderlust criminals as they bumble and fumble back and forth across the sticky inertia of the Florida Everglades.

Followed by The Watermelon Woman (1996) directed by Cheryl Dunye. Writer-director Cheryl Dunye’s debut feature centers on video store clerk-cum-documentarian Cheryl and her obsessive quest to unearth the forgotten contributions of African American women throughout cinematic history. Concentrating on 1930s actress Fae Richards (listed in film credits only as “The Watermelon Woman”), Cheryl conducts interviews with Black film historian Lee Edwards, consults cultural critic Camille Paglia, and sifts through materials at the CLIT Archive in the hopes of unearthing more evidence of Richards' career, long buried by the whitewashing of time.