Charles Bradley and The Menahan Street Band

Thursday, November 29, 2012
8:00 pm - 10:00 pm, Royce Hall - Auditorium

See below for additional information.

Admission

$20 - $40 ($15 UCLA Students)

Get tickets |  More info

15% discount for UCLA Faculty and Staff
10% discount for Alumni Association Members
More info: http://cap.ucla.edu/tickets/faculty.asp

Contact

Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA
(310) 825-2101
info@cap.ucla.edu

Website

http://cap.ucla.edu/calendar/event_detail.asp?id=236

Additional Information

Charles Bradley

The 60-something brilliant soul singer Charles Bradley was discovered late in a very difficult life. Spurred by a little singing experience from his youth and a natural affinity for soul music, in the mid-’90s Bradley began performing around Brooklyn as a James Brown impersonator. A fateful encounter with the soul revivalists of Daptone Records (known for their work with Amy Winehouse and Sharon Jones) transported Bradley from an uncertain future. They paired him with suitable material and personnel, including Thomas Brenneck of the Menahan Street Band. That partnership wrought music that spoke to Bradley’s pain-filled biography — captured on 2011’s No Time for Dreaming. Backed by the deep funk of the Menahan Street Band (who open the show with an all-instrumental set), the “Screaming Eagle of Soul” will move you to the core.

“FREE Pre-Show Concert from Student Committee for the Arts

The Terrace Series featuring Ace Mack and Free Food

Royce Terrace 6:15-7:45 Happy Hour specials for Bruincard holders.

Arrive early and check out these amazing young artists before Charles Bradley and the Menahan Street Band take the stage.

Free Food toys with hip hop, soul, and retro funk sounds. Blending shifting time signatures with pocket hooks, the UCLA student group reinvents classic tones while exploring the boundaries of soul music.

UCLA Freshman Ace Mack draws similarities from the likes of A$AP Rocky and Kendrick Lamar, adding a unique flavor and flow to his music.”

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